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H.g. francis - gruselserie 2 - dracula und frankenstein, die blutfürsten


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Even as he broke new methodological ground in the first edition of Hereditary Genius , Galton turned to familiar non-scientific structures to explain his approach and results. He demonstrates, for example, nearly unqualified appreciation for the university examination, which he adopts as a model for his initial consideration of eminence. From exams, Galton perceived that exceptional capability arises only in small proportion to the average: “In ordinary scholastic examinations,” he writes, “marks are allotted in stated proportions to various specified subjects—so many for Latin, so many for Greek, so many for English history, and the rest. The world, in the same way, but almost unconsciously, allots marks to men” ( Hereditary Genius 7). He trusts that such exams establish the “enormous difference between the intellectual capacity of men” (16); that is, that individuals are born with vastly differing innate ability, a range that no social, economic, or educational disparities can entirely overwhelm (14-16). [2] Galton also takes much from the distribution discernible in exam results, which he finds to be equally relevant to genius in the broader population, as “there is not room,” he insists, “for many men to be eminent” (9). [3] To arrive at a numerical value, a ratio of eminent individuals to the common masses, he turns to biographical sources ready at hand: obituaries in the Times , biographical dictionaries, and compilations such as Men of the Times . Finding confidence in the relative consistency of the figures derived from these varying sources, he concludes that the proportion of eminent men to the general population is consistently around 250 to one million. To drive this point home to readers, Galton turns once again to Oxbridge, adopting the Oxford and Cambridge boat race (which “excites almost a national enthusiasm”) as an illustrative example of the relative scarcity of real eminence; he argues that it would take twenty thousand years of Oxford and Cambridge cohorts “before eight men could be furnished, each of whom would have the rank of the superlative crew” (12). [4]


H.G. Francis - Gruselserie 2 - Dracula Und Frankenstein, Die BlutfürstenH.G. Francis - Gruselserie 2 - Dracula Und Frankenstein, Die BlutfürstenH.G. Francis - Gruselserie 2 - Dracula Und Frankenstein, Die BlutfürstenH.G. Francis - Gruselserie 2 - Dracula Und Frankenstein, Die Blutfürsten

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